Social Movements Fall 2016

Zines were an important medium for spreading social movement ideas throughout the 70’s, 80’s. and 90’s. Students conducted research on a social movement or social movement campaign of their choice and wrote a zine from the perspective of that movement. Take a peek and learn!

Click on the title of the project below the picture to see the final project zine.


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FARM TO TABLE MOVEMENT

by Faye Johnson


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HOW TO: PLAN AN IT’S ON US CAMPUS EVENT

by Julia Howes


dumptrump

THE ANTI-TRUMP MOVEMENT

by Corey Brent


distracted-driving

PEOPLE AGAINST DISTRACTED DRIVING

by Aaron Neumann


freee-the-nipple

FREE THE NIPPLE

by Gillian Wychor


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TRANSGENDER HEALTH CARE ISSUES

By Hayden Northup


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SLAVES OF SEAWORLD

by Amanda Johnson


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EQUALITY IN AFRICA: THE UGANDAN FIGHT FOR LGBTQ+ RIGHTS

by Paige Engelhardt


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PRO-CHOICE ZINE

by Shannon Jeffries


drg

TEACHING SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

by Carol Glasser

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22 Comments Add yours

  1. hayden northup says:

    @DumpTrump

    So you’re not for Trump I take it? Your zine clearly exposes the issues surrounding Trump’s (future) presidency* (*gross)! The zine is short, but is filled with information! It’s also super fun with all of the pictures and creativity. Must have taken you a while! Good job, my friend! -Hayden

    Like

    1. Corey Brent says:

      Thanks brotha!

      Like

  2. hayden northup says:

    @FreetheNipple:A zine about nipples

    My favorite part of your zine is the male nipple cut out on the first or second page HAHA! I didn’t know much about this campaign, but it definitely sends a great message. Thanks for posting links to websites, I will be sure to check them out. Nice work! -Hayden

    Like

  3. Amanda says:

    @EQUALITY IN AFRICA: THE UGANDAN FIGHT FOR LGBTQ+ RIGHTS
    I liked reading this with the background knowledge we got from the speaker on AIDS, HIV and LGBTQ+ in Applied. I thought it helped you gave the background history on LGBTQ+ legislation and people involved in it to understand. The pictures are great. I like this because most people do not think about LGBTQ+ rights outside of the United States. I think it’s great that this can be kind of a nudge to remind people that things still have a long way to go for people around the world who identify as LGBTQ+. I also did a handmade zine but I like the method you used much better because it looks so neat! Another thing I liked was the in memoria page for Dave Kato, I wish I had thought to do a dedication or memoria page as well, after seeing your zine. I think this is a great way to inform people about international LGBTQ+ issues. Good job!

    Like

    1. Gillian says:

      @Equality in Africa: The Ugandan Fight for LGBTQ+ Rights, I really like the way you began with a timeline, I definitely wasn’t up to date on the LGBTQ situation in Uganda, so it really sets the reader up to better understand the rest of your information. I also really enjoyed the photos you chose, I think it important to see those effected, and supported by the movement!

      Amanda, I like your point that many people do not think about the LGBTQ+ communities beyond our borders. That happens with a lot of issues, with the out-of-sight-out-of-mind mentality. and I really like the way both of you guys did a paper-zine! That is a really cool personal touch!

      Like

      1. Paige Engelhardt says:

        Thank you both for your replies. Your feedback was very useful. I agree that we don’t usually think of these issues outside of American, and sometimes European, borders. It’s a tragedy that we don’t because our country doesn’t exist in a bubble. It’s because of Brits and Americans that Uganda is in this spot in the first place. Because of British colonialism homosexuality was first outlawed in Uganda. Pre-British colonialism there were Ugandan rulers who were gay, and being LGBTQ was considered normal. After Uganda got free it was still illegal but not a big deal until Scott Lively came from America to Uganda and began to influence attitudes and policy and inspire other American ‘missionaries’ to do the same. In America people like Lively are a joke, but in Uganda they’re a real threat, and America has done little to help the people of Uganda who are affected by American citizens. I feel like it’s up to us as activists with privilege to realize the affect our country has had and do what we can to help. If either of you would like to learn more I recommend the film God Loves Uganda and John Oliver’s interviews with Pepe Julian Onziema (I’m sure I spelt that wrong). Those videos are part of what inspired me to do my zine on this topic.

        Like

  4. Amanda says:

    @Farm to table. Your zine looks great, I think everything was very well placed. I have never heard of this movement before but I was interested to learn more. This seems like a great solution to all the processed and chemically altered food that is mass produced now. The whole section on the school is really interesting, I would have never of thought that would have succeeded so greatly. My parents live about half an hour from Rochester so I am thinking I will have to check out the People’s Food Co-Op grocery store. This history helped me understand some more about it and I liked the examples that were used, such as examples about the restaurants and grocery stores in Minnesota that are part of this movement. This zine educated me quickly and efficiently about the farm to table movement so I think it would be great education the public as well. Good job!

    Like

  5. Shannon says:

    This would be a handy guide to have, especially if I have to pee! You have a lot of information in your zine! I really like the personal story at the beginning of your zine. I can’t imagine being denied service anywhere, especially medical care. I think in today’s society we take for granted these rights and when I hear a story like this it really shocks me. It breaks my heart to know that people are still discriminated against in our country over their gender. It’s frustrating to see each state have different regulations and rules. How can one possibly know if moving and/or traveling what the laws are from state to state? Did you happen to find in any of your research the possibility of a federal policy regarding trans healthcare in the future? It seems as if the federal government wants to stick their nose in our healthcare already. Why not mandate something for trans persons?
    Shannon

    Like

  6. Shannon says:

    Aaron,
    Distracted driving sure can be devastating! I really liked your interviews. They gave a very good, personal touch to your zine. I have never heard of Broken Heart Syndrome but can totally understand where she is coming from. When my brother passed away I thought my heart was broken too. There’s just a big hole inside of you from where they left. I can’t even imagine losing a child. That would be horrific!
    You have a lot of good information in your zine. It’s reassuring to know that people are out there reaching out to the youth in our society, as well as adults, to get the word out about distracted driving and how dangerous it truly can be. I don’t think that people really understand that this is a big issue. The more people that know about the tragedies that have occurred because of distracted driving the more people that will actually put down their phones while driving (I hope). I really liked the list of things at the end that you could do to prevent distracted driving.
    Shannon

    Like

  7. Julia Howes says:

    @freethenipple.I really enjoyed reading your zine! It’s great that there was a lot of imagery and media you could incorporate into it. I particularly liked how you gave readers tips on how to get involved themselves. I also liked how you described the tactic the campaign is already using. For example, the social media pictures where women Photoshop male nipples onto there own breasts. This is definitely a new social movement because people are mobilizing to collectively act together for this issue. People could get involved through a protest, social media, or other funny tactics you mentioned like wearing breast looking swim tops. You could also relate this to political process theory because in order for this equality to be legal, the movement will have to gave favorable political conditions in order to change this law. Overall, I really enjoyed reading you zine and I think you did a wonderful job

    Like

  8. Julia Howes says:

    @slavesofseaworld
    This zine was great! You packed it full with great information that was really informative. You had lots to say about whale biology, the breeding program, orca’s problems, psychoactive drugs, trainers, deaths at SeaWorld, and SeaWorlds reaction to the death. This zine immediately brought back all the same feelings I felt when I watched the documentary Blackfish. It think this zine will encourage anyone who reads it to get involved. You gave readers some great resources on how they can help, like the petitions people can signs and encouraging people to not support Sea World in any way by not purchasing any tickets from them and only supporting organizations that free the whales. This feels like a new social movement because this issue has been recently exposed and it explores animal rights. Overall I really enjoyed reading this zine and I feel like it will persuade many people to think twice about supporting Sea World.

    Like

  9. Corey Brent says:

    TJ and Rumeal,

    Love the outline and concept of your zine, I did mine fairly the same way. Your movement is probably the touchiest subject of all the zines but you guys did a great job using different movements as examples and explaining each picture you posted. I especially enjoyed, the concept of “From hashtag to movement” because that is how it all started and its great you guys incorporated that into your zine. Overall your zine was very powerful, and full of imagery and explanation.

    Good job!
    Corey

    Like

  10. Corey Brent says:

    Aaron,

    I love the topic you chose because I feel its a topic that isn’t talked about enough, or maybe just isn’t taken as seriously as it should. Your zine had great descriptions and went into great detail about the subjects you were talking about. The part that stood out most to me was the example of the lady who was writing about the Tyler Joanne story, its interesting to see her emotion through the zine and how much his death had actually effected her. This is something that everyone should take notice of, and not take lightly. Overall, this zine was great from top to bottom. The detailed descriptions give us great understanding of how much time you put in, and it looks great.

    Good job!
    Corey

    Like

  11. Aaron says:

    @#BlackLivesMatter

    I have commend you two guys on your zine. It clearly explains what your social movement is about and the problems that are still in our society today. I found the images you provided under the the tittle “The Back Lash” most gripping part of your zine. The photo from 1965 to 2015 shows that there is still a lot that needs to be done in our society when it comes to having equal rights and fair treatment of all people.

    I also like the images you presented throughout the whole zine. It helped connect stories that I had done heard and learned about since the start of the Black Lives Matter movement. The images made me able to recall the exact feelings I had when I heard about the unarmed killings of Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, and many others. On a final note, I wanted to say great job on your zine guys!

    Like

  12. Aaron says:

    @Farm to table

    I found your zine to be very informative and very well put together. I have heard of this movement growing up and think it is a very good cause. Not only is eating locally produced food better you, it also tastes better. The food produced by Farmers have keep the people in our country health for centuries.

    I myself grew up on a farm growing our own food from childhood until I came to Mankato for college. I understand how much the farm to table movement can impact people. My family use to sell some of our extra crops at farmer market’s, so I understand the finical benefits for local farmers. The Farm to Table movement is something that can be great for people’s health and is a movement we all can get behind.

    Like

  13. Gillian says:

    @Black Lives Matter,
    I think it was really great that someone chose to cover this topic, especially with everything that is happening in our world, and so much confusion and ignorance around this movement in particular. I really liked the way you guys laid out your ‘Zine. Its well organized and the information is clear. I wonder now that you have done all this research and created this Zine- can you see yourselves participating in the Movement? And How might you participate? Great job on the ‘Zine!

    Like

  14. Samantha Kerr says:

    @Shannon
    Great topic for your zine. The supreme court gave us the right to choose but that is being challenged every day. I was glad to see you incorporated our vice president – elect and his beliefs regarding choice. Texas has passed legislation making it so women will have to bury aborted and miscarried fetuses starting December 19th and in Ohio a bill stating that abortion after 6 weeks is illegal is currently on their governor’s desk who is an out spoken anti-choice man. So I think it is more important than ever to be educating the masses on a woman’s right to choose. I have always taken the stance of; if you do not agree with abortion don’t have one. A woman’s right to bodily autonomy needs none of the religious groups blocking her access to health care. The war on women is very real and we have a lot of work to do.
    Great zine!!

    Like

  15. Samantha Kerr says:

    @Amanda
    Great zine! Packed full of a lot of really great material. It is laid out nicely and really flows. I am familiar with the horrors that is sea world. Blackfish is absolutely horrifying to watch but so important. We are literally making these amazing creatures live in bath tubs! It’s just mind boggling. And then you learn about Tilikum and you feel so bad for him you can hardly blame him for becoming homicidal. But instead of seeing his pain they let it all continue so he could father babies. I was always of the mindset that we need to drain the tanks and let them free but it’s so hard. A lot of these whales were born in captivity. They have no idea how to survive in the ocean. So when Sea World announced this would be the last generation in the Orca program I was pleased. Just like when we were making up social movements and my group wanted this to be the last generation of lions in the zoos. Again, great job! Your zine is great!

    Like

  16. Faye Johnson says:

    Amanda,
    I think your zine was wonderful! It was full of great information on what happens in Seaworld. I really liked all of the pictures showing the hazzards that happen when you put unfamiliarized whales in a confined space. I liked the information you gave on the documentary Blackfish, I have not seen the documentary myself but the information given in this zine made me wish I had.

    Like

  17. Faye Johnson says:

    Aaron,
    I really enjoyed reading your zine, it was very informative. I have in the past been a somewhat distracted driver and I knew that it was terrible, but I still did it. After I read all of your statistics of accidents caused by distracted drivers, I thought about the times that could have happened to me. I also thought the information you gave on the organizations against distracted driving was great, very informative. But the stories that you put in your zine hit me the hardest because I have had friends in accidents because of distracted driving so it made me think twice about checking my phone while driving. This zine hits on a very serious topic and I think the way you went about giving information about it was very good and helpful.

    Like

  18. Paige Engelhardt says:

    @Slaves of Seaworld. I really liked your zine. It’s in depth, with a lot of information and citing of sources. You clearly put a lot of work into this. I also know you said you didn’t feel like it was very neat, but I really enjoyed the cut and paste look to it. It seemed very grassroots social movement like, and I think it makes it look like you worked even harder on your project. I think you also had the longest zine, so that’s impressive. I knew there was cruelty in Seaworld, but I didn’t really know a lot about it until reading your zine. I also didn’t know that they were cruel to their employees as well as their animals. I didn’t know about the drugs, either. That’s really screwed up. I liked that you included a section on how someone could get involved with the movement. I would have liked to see some info from Seaworld about how they justify what they do to the public.

    Like

  19. Paige Engelhardt says:

    @Pro Choice: Hi, your zine was really interesting. I like that you made the distinction between being prochoice and pro-abortion, since that’s where a lot of people fall without knowing it. Your images were really impactful, especially the one with the coat hanger sign. I think a lot of people who are prolife just think abortion should be stopped and making them illegal will take care of that, without thinking about the consequences of the legislature. The piece by Catherine Klatzker was also impactful. I think it could have been interesting to contain some prolife arguments and counter them. You could also provide some arguments for people who are on the fence about the issue, as I feel those people are more than we realize. You could also include a piece on celebrities who have been open about having abortions. I assume you’ve heard about the new legislature in Ohio. What are your thoughts on that? Also, I have a book that includes an article written by the lawyer who won Roe v Wade if you would be interested in reading it.

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